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Jacqueline Lee Kennedy Onassis (née Bouvier /ˈbuːvieɪ/; July 28, 1929 – May 19, 1994) was the wife of the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy, and the First Lady of the United States from 1961 until his assassination in 1963.

Bouvier was the elder daughter of Wall Street stockbroker John Vernou Bouvier III and socialite Janet Lee Bouvier. In 1951, she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in French literature from George Washington University and went on to work for the Washington Times-Herald as an inquiring photographer.

In 1952, Bouvier met Congressman John F. Kennedy at a dinner party. That November, he was elected as a United States Senator from Massachusetts, and the couple married the following year. They had four children, two of whom died in infancy. As First Lady of the United States, she was known for her highly publicized restoration of the White House and her emphasis on arts and culture. She was the first Catholic to become First Lady. On November 22, 1963, she was riding with the President in a motorcade in Dallas, Texas, when he was assassinated. After his funeral, she and her children withdrew from public view. She married Aristotle Onassis, one of the world's richest men, in 1968.

Following her second husband's death in 1975, she had a career as a book editor for the final two decades of her life. She is remembered for her lifelong contributions to the arts and preservation of historic architecture, as well as for her style, elegance, and grace. She was a fashion icon, and her famous ensemble of pink Chanel suit and matching pillbox hat has become a symbol of her husband's assassination.

Death Edit

In November 1993, Onassis was thrown from her horse while participating in a fox hunt in Middleburg, Virginia, and was taken to the hospital to be examined. A swollen lymph node was discovered in her groin, which was initially diagnosed by the doctor to be caused by an infection. The fall from the horse contributed to her deteriorating health over the next six months. In December, Onassis developed new symptoms, including a stomach ache and swollen lymph nodes in her neck, and was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. She began chemotherapy in January 1994 and publicly announced the diagnosis when she stated that the initial prognosis was good. She continued to work at Doubleday, but by March the cancer had spread to her spinal cord and brain, and by May to her liver.[179][181] Onassis made her last trip home from New York Hospital–Cornell Medical Center on May 18, 1994. The following night on May 19, 1994, at 10:15 p.m., she died in her sleep at age 64.